credulous


credulous
credulous, gullible both mean unduly trusting or confiding but they differ significantly in their implications as do their corresponding nouns credulity and gullibility.
Credulous and credulity stress a tendency to believe readily and uncritically whatever is proposed for belief without examination or investigation; typically they suggest inexperience, nai'veté, or careless habits of thought rather than inherent incapacity
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far from being unconscious of heredity . . . men were insanely credulous about it; they not only believed in the transmission of qualities and habits from generation to generation, but expected the son to begin mentally where the father left off— Shaw

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Hess, who was as deeply interested in psychic matters as Lanny, and far more credulousUpton Sinclair

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we know from the satiric comments of Lucian and from the ingenuousness of Pliny the deep credulity of the average Roman— Buchan

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Gullible and gullibility, on the other hand, stress the idea of being duped; they suggest more the lack of necessary intelligence than the lack of skepticism, and connote the capacity for being made a fool of
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it was discovered that this man who had been raised to such a height by the credulity of the public was himself more gullible than any of his depositors— Conrad

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that any of us may be so gullible and so forgetful as to be duped into making "deals" at the expense of our Allies— Roosevelt

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monstrous was the gullibility of the people. How could an overcoat at twelve and sixpence be "good"— Bennett

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Analogous words: assenting, acquiescing or acquiescent, agreeing, subscribing (see corresponding verbs at ASSENT): believing, crediting (see corresponding nouns at BELIEF)
Antonyms: incredulous: skeptical
Contrasted words: uncertain, doubtful, suspicious, mistrustful (see corresponding nouns at UNCERTAINTY)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Credulous — Cred u*lous (kr?d ? l?s; 135), a. [L. credulus, fr. credere. See {Creed}.] 1. Apt to believe on slight evidence; easily imposed upon; unsuspecting. Landor. [1913 Webster] Eve, our credulous mother. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. Believed too readily.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • credulous — I adjective believing, credulus, deceivable, disposed to believe, easily convinced, easily deceived, easily duped, easily taken in, green, gullible, misjudging, naive, overly trustful, persuasible, prone to believe, simple, trusting, undoubting,… …   Law dictionary

  • credulous — 1570s, from L. credulus that easily believes, trustful, from credere to believe (see CREDO (Cf. credo)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • credulous — [adj] gullible, naive accepting, believing, born yesterday*, dupable, easy mark*, falling for*, green, overtrusting, simple, swallow whole, taken in, trustful, trusting, uncritical, unquestioning, unsophisticated, unsuspecting, unsuspicious,… …   New thesaurus

  • credulous — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ excessively ready to believe things; gullible. DERIVATIVES credulity noun credulously adverb. ORIGIN Latin credulus, from credere believe …   English terms dictionary

  • credulous — [krej′oo ləs, krej′ə ləs] adj. [L credulus < credere: see CREED] 1. tending to believe too readily; easily convinced 2. resulting from or indicating credulity credulously adv. credulousness n …   English World dictionary

  • credulous — credible, creditable, credulous Credible means ‘able to be believed’, with reference to people or statements: • I stand on the balcony, apparently musing on this very credible story, but really wondering how soon we can step back inside R. James …   Modern English usage

  • credulous — adjective Etymology: Latin credulus, from credere Date: 1576 1. ready to believe especially on slight or uncertain evidence < accused of swindling credulous investors > 2. proceeding from credulity < …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • credulous — [[t]kre̱ʤʊləs[/t]] ADJ GRADED (disapproval) If you describe someone as credulous, you have a low opinion of them because they are too ready to believe what people tell them and are easily deceived. ...quack doctors charming money out of the… …   English dictionary

  • credulous — credulously, adv. credulousness, n. /krej euh leuhs/, adj. 1. willing to believe or trust too readily, esp. without proper or adequate evidence; gullible. 2. marked by or arising from credulity: a credulous rumor. [1570 80; < L credulus, equiv.… …   Universalium


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